Spring Wildflower Walk

Brett Engstrom

June 5, 2022  1:00 - 4:00

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Spring has sprung and it is time to get outdoors to enjoy the signs of spring. Please join us for this free wildflower walk led by field ecologist and naturalist, Brett Engstrom, who has over a dozen years of experience studying the flora, fauna, geology and soils of Weeks State Park. Brett has led nature walks at the park for many years.

Meet at the parking lot at the start of the scenic auto road up Mount Prospect at 1 PM. Bring a hand lens and flower guide if you like and dress for the weather. The free program ends at 4 pm.

Brett Engstrom is a self-employed field ecologist and naturalist. He compiles inventories of natural communities and rare plants in New Hampshire and Vermont. Brett received his B.S. degree in biology from Earlham College in Indiana, and his M.S. degree from Univ. of Vermont in the field naturalist program. Brett is working with other ecologists on the Northern Forest Atlas. 

More information can be found at this link:

http://northernforestatlas.org/about/organization-personnel/

 

Event Report

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June 5th Flower Walk

The 17th Annual Spring Wildflower Walk was held at Weeks State Park on Sunday, June 5th. The walk was led by botanist Brett Engstrom and hosted by Art Hammon of the Weeks State Park Association.


We had 15 participants on a gorgeous Sunday afternoon. We observed 56 plant species and 1 unusual lichen species. We also noted 13 bird species during the flower walk.


One of our favorite flowers, the yellow lady slipper, was admired by all the participants.


Botanist Brett Engstrom updated the participants about the work he is doing creating “A Flora of Mount Prospect” publication. This publication will feature over 400 species of plants that have been recorded on the mountain since 1895. The WSPA and generous donors are funding this important project. Previously the WSPA and donors funded the publication of “The Geology of Mount Prospect.”

Photos courtesy of Sally Pratt; text courtesy of David Govatski