JackPulpitrsz.jpg

Nature

Weeks State Park has truly remarkable natural attributes whose foundation, quite literally, is the mountain itself. Although part of the "Granite State," the geology of the mountain is unique in that some of the rocks have a calcareous base that allows plants to grow here that are not usually found in NH such as maidenhair fern.  In addition to our renowned educational programs presented at the park, the WSPA has also sponsored several scientific studies that have increased our knowledge and appreciation of the natural systems at work here.

 

Geology

Behind the Scenes

In 2019 the Weeks State Park Association sponsored a geologic study of Weeks State Park.


To quote our geologists, "Weeks State Park is a fantastic place to get a glimpse of the geologic forces and events that have shaped New England and the White Mountains. Major faults are revealed here, as well as a variety of rocks that span 500 million years.  For a relatively small area Weeks State Park reveals great geology that is accessible for all to explore"

GeoCoverTitle1rsz.jpg
 
IMG_4643 (2)crprsz.jpg

Plants

The Weeks State Park Association traditionally sponsors two flower walks each year - spring and autumn.

 
The walks are led by seasoned, professional botanists who welcome all levels of plant enthusiasts. An inventory of the plants noted on each walk is maintained by the Association.

 
IMG_6054arsz.JPG

Ferns

The unique geology of Mount Prospect supports a greater variety of fern species (28) than most areas of similar size in New Hampshire. The Lost Nation Gabbro and Ammonoosuc Volcanic Amphibolite bedrock contains calcite and other minerals that provide the fertility for this diversity. The “Geologic History of Weeks State Park” by Dykstra Eusden and Woodrow Thompson has the details and maps that explain the geology. Copies of this full color booklet are available at the park visitor center.

 
IMG_8078arsz.jpg

Trees of Weeks State Park

At Weeks State Park there have been 34 unique species of trees recorded. A survey of flora at the Park was performed by Botanist Brett Engstrom in 2005 as well as subsequent field surveys done by retired Forester, David Govatski.

 
IMG_7045a (2).jpg

Birds

Each spring the WSPA celebrates International Migratory Bird Day by sponsoring a bird walk at the park.


We meet at the base of the scenic auto road at the parking lot at 7 AM. The walk ascends the auto road - looking and listening for a variety of neo-tropical migratory birds that have recently arrived. We expect to see a variety of warblers and flycatchers at this birding hotspot.