Loon Field Trip at Martin Meadow Pond

Caroline Hughes

July 29, 2022  8:00 - 10:00am

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Join us on Friday July 29th at 8:00 AM for a paddle at Martin Meadow Pond in Lancaster to visit with a pair of New Hampshire’s breeding loons. In a small group setting, we will observe and interpret loon behaviors and vocalizations, learn the fascinating history of Martin Meadow Pond’s loon pair, and discuss the conservation concerns that have affected the loons on the pond and the management work being done to help them successfully reproduce each year.


What to bring:

  • Canoe or kayak and paddles. Please plan on transporting your boat to the pond.

  • PFD (life jacket) for each person. Participants are required to wear a PFD while on the water during this trip.

  • Binoculars. We will be following best-practices for ethically observing wildlife, including maintaining a distance from the loons. Binoculars are recommended for the best viewing experience.

  • Sunscreen, hat, bug protection, water shoes, rain gear.

(loon photos by the late Kittie Wilson)

 

Event Report
Loon Field Trip at Martin Meadow Pond

Caroline Hughes

July 29, 2022  8:00 - 10:00am

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It was a perfect morning for a paddle at Martin Meadow Pond. And, a perfect morning to explore a loon habitat, view some loons and learn more about their behavior from the Loon Preservation Committee's Volunteer and Outreach Biologist, Caroline Hughes.

 
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Our group has kayaks and one canoe at the ready and are about to launch.

 
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Before setting off, Caroline has a few words about loons and the plan for the day which includes a cautionary note about not getting too close. With Caroline is fellow biologist Jack Fogarty. Jack entertained the group with a tale of his recent sighting of two eagles locked in air-to-air combat.

 
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And they're off! While the objective was to view the loons, 3 blue herons were also spotted.

 
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The group saw the loon family. Three adult loons were doing what Caroline referred to as a "circle dance." This is the behavior when a "foreigner" comes in to assess the strengths of the resident loon pair.

Caroline also talked about the history of the loon platform at Martin Meadow Pond.

It was a wonderful excursion on this beautiful pond and an opportunity to observe loons first hand under the guidance of an expert from the Loon Preservation Committee.

Thank you so much Caroline for the leading our group on this field trip.  It was the icing on the cake after a great feast at the Summit House the evening before.

To learn more about the Loon Preservation Committee's work, please go to their website:

www.loon.org

They also have a channel on YouTube where they have posted many videos of loons.